An introduction to CSS @counter-style

The characters that indicate items in a list are called counters — they can be bullets or numbers. They are defined using the list-style-type CSS property. CSS1 introduced a list of predefined styles to be used as counter markers. The initial list was then slightly extended with addition of more predefined counter styles in CSS2.1. Even with 14 predefined counter styles, it still failed to address use cases from around the world.

Now, the CSS Counter Styles Level 3 specification, which reached Candidate Recommendation last week, adds new predefined counter styles to the existing list that should address most common counter use cases.

In addition to the new predefined styles, the spec also offers an open-ended solution for the needs of worldwide typography by introducing the @counter-style at-rule — which lets us define custom counter styles or even extend existing ones — and the symbols() function. The latter is a shorthand for defining inline styles and is useful when the fine-grained control that @counter-style offers is not needed.

This is the excerpt from an article I wrote in the hacks.mozilla.org blog when @counter-style was shipped in Firefox. The article provides a guide to using the new counter features of CSS Level 3. Please read the full article here. See a demo of various @counter-style usages here (works only in Firefox).